IS #79: Worsted Weight Wonders

It has been quite a while since my last Inspiration Saturday post, but it’s also been some time since I’ve had a chance to really sink my teeth into a pattern search. Many of these posts are born of a burning need to find just the right pattern for just the right yarn and lately I haven’t had any pattern-matching conundrums. However, I’ve just discovered that The Verdant Gryphon has brought back one of my favorite yarn bases (Zaftig Bugga, a worsted weight MCN blend) and well, I had to know how many skeins to buy for my next project, didn’t I? Let the luxurious, worsted-weight-accessory-pattern curating commence!

The Millwater cowl by Beth Kling is one I’ve had queued for Zaftig for quite some time.

Copyright Beth Kling. Click for pattern page.

I knit this pattern out of Malabrigo Twist a while back and really enjoyed it. The knitting is simple and soothing, just garter stitch with a ribbed cable that is knit flat and then seamed. I think the finished piece is striking and versatile and looks lovely in semi-solids and variegated yarns.

Another simple-but-striking cabled pattern is the Tidal Flats hat by Melissa Thomson.

Copyright Alexa Ludeman. Click for pattern page.

This hat is part of the Cascadia collection, which contains many lovely accessory and sweater patterns. This hat would work best in a semi-solid, so as not to obscure all that smooth reverse stockinette.

I’ve been enamored with this Bosc scarf by Robin Ulrich for ages:

Copyright Robin Ulrich. Click for pattern page.

It’s just so dang elegant, and knit in worsted weight it would be cozy, beautiful, and fairly quick to knit.

This Fission mitts by Annika Barranti would be quite cushy in Zaftig.

Copyright Vivian Aubrey. Click for pattern page.

I love the laced-up i-cord details, the cables, and the twisted stitches. You need a yarn with good stitch definition to really make these pop. The style is a little bit similar to my Berriboned Wrists pattern (lacing-wise, anyway):

Copyright Alicia Morandi. Click for pattern page.

The wristwarmers were initially designed with Zaftig, and are quite cozy as all get-out in the heavier weight yarn. (I’m wearing them as I type, in fact!)

To up the elegance ante, we have the Juneberry Shawl designed by Jared Flood.

Copyright Brooklyn Tweed. Click for pattern page.

I’ve adored this shawl for quite some time, but have been having internal debates over whether I want to knit it out of Zaftig or something a bit drapier with some silk content, like Codex or Mondegreen.

Lastly, and the pattern I will most likely knit first, is the Lucy Hat by Carina Spencer.

Copyright Knitscene. Click for pattern page.

I think the plump, tightly-twisted texture of Zaftig will lend great stability to this striking, structured cloche. I love the stitch definition in the photo, the possibility of amazing color combination, and that jaunty flipped brim. This hat needs to be rocked so hard, and I plan to rock it well.

Have you been inspired by anything in particular lately? What’s your favorite use for worsted weight yarn? Let us know in the comments below!

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IS #78: Good Clean Fun

Today’s Inspiration Saturday post veers away from the realm of yarn and knitting, and towards a newer obsession that’s been piquing my interest lately thanks to Sweet Sheep: handmade personal care products. Specifically, handmade soap.

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Champagne soap by Calise Soapworks & Such. Click for Etsy shop.

Soap is made by an interesting chemical reaction (called “saponification“) that occurs when you mix together fats/tallows/oils and lye in certain quantities. There are a few benefits to using handmade soap. Firstly, handmade soap retains all the natural glycerin that is produced during the saponification process so it is extra moisturizing.

IS #78: Good Clean Fun | Woolen Diversions

Salt soap by e.l.m tree suds. Click for Etsy shop.

Secondly, one can custom blend the types of oils used to produce specific results (such as using olive oil for a harder bar, sea salt for extra minerals, or shea butter for additional moisturizing properties). Of course this also means one can control whether they use soap made with organic ingredients or particular fragrances and colorants.

IS #78: Good Clean Fun | Woolen Diversions

Sweet Lemon Creme soap by Royalty Soaps. Click for Etsy shop.

Thirdly, they’re really beautiful! The prettiness factor can’t be ignored. You will never find a mass-produced bar of soap that looks so delicious. You likely won’t find any that feel or smell nearly as good, either.

IS #78: Good Clean Fun | Woolen Diversions

Peach Pie Soap by Toil and Trouble Bath. Click for Etsy shop.

Finally, and most importantly, I love the creative aspect of handmade soaps. Some soaps (as proven above) seem practically edible! I think there’s something really special about taking a humble and unassuming bar of soap and turning it into something delightful and extraordinary. Why not add a little whimsy to your day, amIright? Speaking of extraordinary: that pie soap was made by an 11 year old kid, and he donates half his proceeds to a supportive housing coalition! You can check out his story on the Soap Queen blog. If that’s not inspiring, I don’t know what is!

Within the last 6 months or so, I’ve gone from a plastic-poof-and-body-wash kinda gal to an artisan bar soap user, all the way. I’m not sure yet whether I’ll venture into cold process soapmaking territory quite yet (there’s a fair bit of equipment involved and lye is pretty nasty stuff to work with) but there are some amazingly creative things you can do with pre-made soap bases, which I’m hoping to explore soon. What kind of soap do you use? Had you ever thought about handmade soaps before? What’s been inspiring you, lately? Share with us and link up you post in the comments!

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Pura Vida! Part 2

When I last spoke about my Costa Rican honeymoon, we were preparing to leave Alajuela (in the Central Valley) and travel 4-5 hours to Cahuita, a quiet little town on the Caribbean coast. Like last time, I’ve created photo galleries so that if you hover over a picture its caption should pop up, and if you click on a picture it will take you to a large-sized version of the photo. Onwards!

Our entire first day consisted of travel, more or less. It was fascinating to watch the landscape change from mountainous and crowded to more pastoral and full of pineapple, palm, and banana plantations. We stopped at the Del Monte processing facility on our way. The workday was over so there wasn’t too much to see, but it was interesting anyway. When we finally arrived at Coral Hill Bungalows, we were thrilled. The owners were incredibly friendly and helpful, the bungalow itself was gorgeous, and it had a lovely front porch. And the fresh fruit and pastry breakfasts were delightful, I had the best croissants of my life there. I highly recommend this location if you’re planning to travel to Cahuita! We were happy that the longest stretch of our trip (4 days) was spent there. Just be sure you go to the correct Playa Negra when you’re looking for it, our driver went to the one in Puerto Viejo accidentally at first! Our first full day in Cahuita happened to be the Fiasco’s birthday, so we headed to the bus station to visit a very special place.

You know this is the only part of this post that anyone will care about: SLOTHS! We visited the Sloth Sanctuary because the man wanted to see sloths on his birthday, and see sloths we did. Apparently Buttercup has her own TV show and is kind of a big deal. Part of the tour involved a canoe ride down the river (for which the torrential rain stopped and the sun came out just in time) where we saw an abundance of wildlife: bats, lizards, birds, and of course, some rehabilitated sloths. There are two species of sloths in Costa Rica: the two-fingered sloth and the three-fingered sloth. Surprisingly little is known about their reproductive habits, for one of them we have no idea how long gestation is and cannot tell when a sloth is pregnant until a wee little sloth pops out one day. As a biologist, I find it fascinating how little is still known about basic life history of some species. (Which makes me particularly worried about the rate of extinction, the idea of losing things we have yet to discover or understand is extra horrible.) And then there were baby sloths, which are just about the cutest things ever.

We made friends with a neighborhood dog, whom we dubbed Sweetheart. He accompanied us on our walks every single time we left our bungalow, I don’t know how he found us! On our second day, we decided to make the most of the one truly sunny day of our trip and visit the Cahuita National Park for a short hike and a swim. This park is an absolute must-visit. The beginning of the trail is easy to hike, mostly a wide, flat sandy stretch. There is wildlife everywhere (more on that later) and easy access to long  stretches of unoccupied beaches. At a couple points along the trail you need to wade through a shallow river, and eventually we had to stop hiking because the trails were essentially 4″ deep in mud (yay, rainy season) and one of us had a little hissy fit about that (not naming names). But it all worked out for the best, since we spent an enjoyable afternoon rolling around in the bathwater-warm waves. As a native Long Islander, the concept of warm water at the beach is completely foreign to me! It was beautiful, though. Leafcutter ants, by the by, are some of the coolest insects ever. They actually practice agriculture! They cut leaves, carry them back to their nests, and use them as a culture to grow a very specific type of fungus that they eat for food. Seriously guys, biology is fascinating.

That’s all I have time for today, but I’ll finish summing up our time in Cahuita in the next post! What’s the coolest thing you’ve seen or learned about in nature? Has anything else been inspiring you lately? Share with us!

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IS #77: Seafoam Inspired

My sweet and wonderful FiascoHubs (do we like the new nickname? he will forever be a Fiasco… but now that he’s a husband rather than a fiance I’m wondering if it needs the ‘Hubs’ addition?) surprised me with ‘souvenir yarn’ over our wedding weekend.

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He apparently went into the local yarn store and said something along the lines of “she likes crazy fiber, wild stuff like ox and quiviut, and she loves blues and seafoam greens” and he left with three skeins of that gorgeousness above. The yarn is a laceweight 50/50 yak/silk blend and it is divine. My fella did very well, but now what to make?

Copyright LachesisandCo. Click for pattern page.

The first thing that jumped to mind was The Mermaid’s Gift shawl designed by Tori Gurbisz. I’ve had this one queued for quite a while and I think the whole look and feel of this pattern would be perfect with the seafoam color of the yarn. My only reservation is that it would only use up a mere 400 yards while I have over 1200 yards of the yarn, but it would certainly be a great use of a single skein of luxurious laceweight you might have hanging around.

Copyright knitlab. Click for pattern page.

The next beauty that jumped to mind was the Seascape Stole designed by Kieran Foley. I’ve long admired the sinuous shifting lines of this stole, and it’s a free pattern on Knitty so that’s always a plus. My big reservation with this one is that the charts are rather large and unwieldy and I had hoped to take this project along on our honeymoon as travel knitting, so it might not be the best choice.

Copyright Kieran Foley. Click for pattern page.

Interestingly, the same designer has another sea-inspired stole that I greatly admire: High Seas. It sounds like this one has wrong side patterning and it on the trickier side, so it also might not make great travel knitting (though it is lovely).

Copyright joelle. Click for pattern page.

Moving on from the sea theme, we have the Echo Flower Shawl by Jenny Johnson Johnen which is based on the Laminaria shawl designed by Elizabeth Freeman. This shawl is chock full of complex Estonian stitches but it is really, truly gorgeous. I imagine in my silky seafoam yarn it would be pretty incredible.

Copyright stebo79. Click for pattern page.

Even though the sample for Morgain by Stefanie Bolf is all ‘dark and moody’ I can’t help but picture it in my yarn and think it would be glorious. I love the way the lace patterning grows in length and width as it cascades across the shawl.

Copyright Strokkur. Click for pattern page.

This is a gorgeous variation (drapier yarn, larger needles, beads instead of nupps) of the Shallow Waters shawl designed by Mia Rinde. I imagine my version would look much like this one. The more I look at photos of this shawl, the higher it is creeping up my list! It incorporates the undulating lines I like so much with the almost gothic, peaked edging that I find very pretty on triangular shawls.

What would you knit with up to 1200 yards of yak/silk lusciousness? Do you have a favorite sea-inspired pattern? Please share in the comments below!

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IS #76: This Guy

On this day — our wedding day — my inspiration can really only come from one source: my Fiasco.

yarn 075If there’s a sweeter, kinder, more giving man out there — I haven’t met him.

renfaire 005He’s inappropriate and hilarious and consistently keeps me on my toes.

He’s great with kids and amazing with my entire family.

yarn 062He loves to cook and clean (thank goodness!) and really does the lion’s share of the work around the house.

IMG_5641He’s creative, brilliant, and enthusiastic about everything he does.

2009_June 047And he’s equally enthusiastic about everything I do — from horseshoe crab surveys to fiber festivals and Sweet Sheep vending shows — he supports me in anything and everything I dream up.

IMG_6368I am incredibly lucky to have met this man and am proud to make him my husband!

(P.S. If you’re the type that likes to peek at wedding photos, feel free to search the #morandi2014 hashtag on Instagram or check out our Wedding Party app site where people can upload photos as the day progresses.)

IS #75: Under the Sea

My apologies for missing my Inspiration Saturday posts over the last couple of weeks, I finally have a moment to breathe today! Let’s dive right into it, shall we?

I don’t know how it’s possible that I got to my 75th IS post without featuring Hunter Hammersen. I’ve mentioned her designs plenty of times on this blog but have apparently failed to write a comprehensive post about her work, which is ridiculous since I instantly purchase every book of patterns she publishes. I love her design sense and in particular I love the inspiration behind her Knitter’s Curiosity Cabinet series.

“Curiosity cabinets were collections of wonderful objects brought together to inspire, delight, and inform. I loved the idea of assembling a knitter’s curiosity cabinet—one full of fancy edgings and captivating stitch patterns and fabulous shapes instead of shells and fossils and seeds. These books are the result.” – H.H.

Curiosity cabinets (full of shells, bones, plant specimens, fossils, preserved animals, etc.) have always appealed to me… they encapsulate everything I love about museums, science, natural history, and the sense of wonder with which insightful people view their world. Marrying that idea with knitting patterns was a stroke of genius. Hunter has designed 2 patterns — one sock and one accessory — based on each vintage illustration in her books of either plants (volume I), butterflies (volume II), or marine life (volume III).

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My copy of volume III.

When I read that the third volume would be based on marine illustrations, I was particularly excited (my job involves researching marine organisms). I confess that after flipping through, I was a teensy bit disappointed with how some of the prints were interpreted into knitwear — but perhaps I had particularly high expectations. Some of the sock designs feel a little bit repetitive (many have a similar look) and there were a few designs for which I couldn’t really see the relationship to the print. I think some of the gorgeous prints could’ve been interpreted in different ways that might have made for more interesting designs. That said, the book is and admirable piece of work and is full of lovely things that I have already queued to knit someday. Here are some of my favorites.

Copyright Hunter Hammersen. Click for pattern page.

The cover sock, Zostera marina, is absolutely wonderful. I want it in my sock drawer right now. The color, the wavy lines, the BFL sock yarn it is knit from… sigh. I want it. The difficulty with a pattern like this (for me) is finding the right sock yarn. A vast majority of my stash consists of variegated colorways, which just won’t work well with all the vertical lines and stitch details in this sock. Looks like someone will need to enhance her semi-solid sock yarn stash! (Aw, shucks.)

Copyright Hunter Hammersen. Click for pattern page.

In truth, the stitch pattern used in this Padina pavonia sock is nothing new (it’s a variation of the Old Shale or Feather-and-Fan stitch) but it still looks really great in this sock and I think it’s one of the few patterns in the book that would actually play really nicely with variegated or stripey yarn.

Copyright Hunter Hammersen. Click for pattern page.

I really dig the funky stitch used in these Planorbis corneus socks. This is one where I don’t quite see how the pattern was inspired by the print, perhaps because the stitch used reminds me so much of rotifers (microscopic aquatic organisms) and that’s all I see when I look at it, not shells. However, it’s still a fine-looking sock with a basically simple pattern and really fun detail, so I’m bound to make it someday. It’s also available free on Knitty.

Copyright Hunter Hammersen. Click for pattern page.

I have nothing really to say about this Fucus asparagoides socks except that I am a sucker for lacy socks, thus, I love them.

Copyright Hunter Hammersen. Click for pattern page.

Finally, I am a big fan of this Pelagia noctiluca hat. It’s lacy, slightly slouchy, does an excellent job of evoking its inspiration print, has great crown decreases, and is knit with DK weight yarn which is a perfect weight for stylish hats. This one is very likely to happen.

Do you have a favorite Hunter Hammersen pattern? What’s been inspiring you, lately? Leave a comment and/or share your blog post with us below!

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IS #74: Handspun Dreams

Audry asked an excellent question in the comments of my last post about what my handspun yarn will grow up to be. It appears that I tend to spin like I knit: in fits and starts, with many, many works-in-progress, that take quite a while to come to fruition. I have been spinning since January 2012 and over the last 2.5 years I’ve completely finished spinning 17 full skeins of yarn (one skein = 2-6 oz, depending on project) and 14 little ‘test’ or sample skeins (10 from my spinner’s study and 4 from trying out new tools or experimenting).

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Some of my more recent finished skeins (since October 2013).

And then, of course, I have 12 spinning WIPs (eek). One on each of my spindles, two that are resting off of my spindles, and the remaining are wheel projects in various stages of completion (why yes, I am out of bobbins, how did you guess?). The things I could accomplish with just a little more follow-through would be pretty amazing, amIright?!

All of my handspun projects to date!

Of my 17 full-size finished skeins, I have (at least partially) knit up 10 of them, have a hibernating WIP with the 11th, and gave 2 of them away as gifts. That leaves me with 4 unaccounted-for skeins.

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Four skeins of handspun waiting to be knit…

In the top left, we have the lovely skein of alpaca/silk I carded on a rented drum carder and finished spinning in April. It will most likely grow up to become a Morning Surf Scarf, when I get a chance to knit more regularly (read: post-wedding).

Copyright Jackie Erickson-Schweitzer. Click for pattern page.

The two skeins in the top right were from a spin-along last quarter. They are a generous 550 yards of 2-ply BFL wool destined to become a shawl. I’ve been eyeing up Joji’s The Way From Brighton, what do you think?

Copyright Joji Locatelli. Click for pattern page.

The skein on the bottom left is some more BFL, this time around 170 yards of DK-weight chain-plied yarn. I was thinking of some sort of hat, perhaps a Jango designed by Svetlana Volkova. I’d use it for the main color and then alternate some scraps for the contrast colors. Not sure yet, though. I like the neutral used in the pattern photo and I might want to pair my skein with a calmer color and knit a two-color shawl or cowl instead.

Copyright tweedysheep. Click for pattern page.

The final skein pictured is the last skein that I knit into a finished object way back in October 2013 (siiiiigh). I knit that fluffy little 4-ply Merino skein into a pretty fabulous hat. What are your favorite handspun projects? I’d love to see what you’ve made with yours or what you’ve been dreaming of making. Share a link or leave a comment below!

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Too Busy For Inspiration

It’s a sad, sad week when I’ve been too busy working, battling a cold, and running around willy-nilly to give my weeky Inspiration Saturday post its proper due. Even when I know I have a busy weekend, I try to plan my post ahead of time. No luck this week, however. This morning I’m off to vend my Sweet Sheep Body Shoppe products at the Mount Hope Farmer’s Market in Bristol, Rhode Island. (If you’re local, come say hi! Open 9 am – 1 pm.) Then the Fiasco and I need to visit our wedding reception hall to have a chat about details and then I’ll probably fall into bed, weary of body and hoarse of throat, for probably the rest of the weekend. (Fun times, eh?)

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Polka-dots!

To make up for the lack of my usual pattern-and-yarn-inspired ramblings, I’ll leave you with a photo of my brand new stunner of spindle. This is another beauty made by the talented Joshua Lynch from TexasJeans on Etsy. I’ve been enamored with this polka-dot style inlay since I first saw it and finally inquired about a custom order. He said he probably wouldn’t get to it until June. Because I got impatient, I went ahead and purchased one of his Russian spindles to hold me over, figuring I could justify buying two spindles if they were a month apart… turns out, I ended up with two new spindles in one week! While I’ve had to dodge some (probably well-deserved) glares from the Fiasco, it’s so pretty that I just don’t feel very bad at all about my sudden-onset spindle gluttony.

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Experimenting with some Louet merino/silk fiber.

Details: The whorl is made with birdseye maple, and inlaid with purpleheart, redheart, and osage orange. A pretty purplish dymondwood was used for the shaft. I love whatever waxes Joshua uses to finish his spindles, they are so incredibly smooth and silky-feeling. The whorl is just over 2.5″ wide and the whole things weighs 1.24 oz (37 g). It’s a nice mid-weight top whorl with a pretty, balanced spin. I plan to do a little experiment with the fiber shown, spinning about 0.5 oz on each of my spindles and comparing how spindle style/weight/etc affect the finished yarns (but more on that later).

That’s all I can manage at the moment. I hope you have an enjoyable Saturday!

IS #73: Spindle-Spun

It felt good to confess my stalking of spindles to you all last week. Some of you affirmed my spindle infatuation with stories of your own collections, others expressed wonderment and curiosity about all the different types you’ve never thought of before. It made me feel a little less ridiculous for my spindle coveting… just in time for this beauty to arrive!

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Our new friend.

This little lovely is a birdseye maple Russian spindle from TexasJeans. It is long (12″) and lightweight (0.9 oz, 27 g) and is a quick little spinner. I was surprised at how fast and short its spin was, and how much it differed from my heavier Tibetan. My fingers quickly got the hang of it, however, and I spent an enjoyable Friday night spinning up some silk from The Wacky Windmill and watching Once Upon A Time.

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Mmmmmmm, silk.

The key to supported spindling (in my opinion) is spinning from carded rolags. Whatever fiber you’re working with, it will spin up much more smoothly and evenly if you card it first. This means your yarns will likely all be woolen or semi-woolen, depending on how you draft. Also keep in mind that I’m a newbie and generally winging it when it comes to spinning supported, so there could be better ways to do things. In light of that, for inspiration this week I decided to seek out gorgeous handspun yarns on Ravery that had been spun on supported spindles. Prepare to be amazed!

Photo copyright ArcticWoolies.

Photo copyright MaryBear.

 

Photo copyright LillyVoigt.

Photo copyright NotNotKnitting.

Photo copyright RoeOfPurls.

Ok, things I’ve learned from this exercise: spinners do a less-than-stellar job of documenting their spins on Ravelry! I checked every handspun page of every spinner in the Spindlemania group that I KNOW has some gorgeous support spindles… and nada. Nothing. No projects on the support spindles and barely any handspun posted at all! So I just ganked most of these photos from the Thick Or Thin Challenge thread in the Spindle Candy group. I was hoping to show off some finished yarns but these are cool, too!

What’s been inspiring you lately? Share with us or link you own blog post in the comments!

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IS #72: Getting Graphic

I’m pretty sure stripes have always been popular in knitting, but I feel like I’ve noticed a whole flood of shawls lately featuring bold stripes used in creative ways… and I love it. I always have promising color combinations in the stash that need projects and I think a couple of these graphic pieces might just do the trick.

Copyright Audry Nicklin. Click for pattern page.

First up is Beyond the Pines, a shawl designed by the talented Audry Nicklin of the Bear Ears blog. I love the unique, 5-pointed shape of this shawl, the way the stripes highlight the points, and the way the wide, textured border grounds the edge.

Copyright leethal. Click for pattern page.

The sideways-knit Pigment shawl by Lee Meredith is another great example of a bold use of color. In typical Leethal style, this shawl can be knit in any weight and with nearly any amount of yarn. It’s really versatile and I imagine it would be a great way to use up leftovers and miniskeins.

Copyright Classic Elite Yarns. Click for pattern page.

The Geneva shawlette by Amy Loberg is really cool! The use of two contrast colors for the short row wedges is really flashy, and since there are only a handful of the stripey bits, they are not overwhelming. Using them sparingly was really effective, I think.

Copyright stebo79. Click for pattern page.

Similar to the last one, the Xandra shawl by Stefanie Bold makes great use of a small amount of accent color. In this case, lines radiate out from one corner to the jagged edge. It’s a really cool look and I’m even kind digging the charcoal/hot pink combo, which is normally outside of my color comfort zone.

Copyright Jeannie Kubricht. Click for pattern page.

I think this Nostalgia Shawl by Elena Nodel might be one of my favorites. I love the crescent shape, the swoopy asymmetrical stripes, and the unexpected mesh wedges. Can a shawl be punk? This one strikes me as kind of punk. I might need to cast on for it sooner than later.

Copyright Sivia Harding. Click for pattern page.

The Rainshadow scarf by Sivia Harding is quite outside her normal design style but is also really cool. This garter stitch piece is worked lengthwise in a triangular shape, with the stripes radiating from one corner out to the jagged edge. More short rows and eyelets and stripes. I think there are some beads in there, too. Love it!

Copyright MillyWipstash. Click for pattern page.

The Cameo shawl by Paulina Popiolek is another great example of how some simple stripes, eyelets, and edgings can make for a striking shawl. It’s one of those patterns that makes me simultaneously jealous (“Man, why didn’t I think of that?”) and covetous (“I want it!”).

Copyright Paulina Popiolek. CLick for pattern page.

No doubt recognizing that she had a good thing going with her Cameo shawl, Paulina designed the similar-but-still-so-different Axis shawl. It involves similar striping and jagged edging but employs a really bold and unexpected slipped stitch section in the middle there.

Copyright Emily Peters. Click for pattern page.

For a rainbow-chevron-ripple-tastic shawl, there’s the Berkely, CA pattern by Emily Peters. I’m a sucker for rainbow yarns paired with neutrals, and I think this pattern manages to look both psychadelic and wearable.

Copyright Lilofil. Click for pattern page.

Finally, we have the stripey-and-texture-ific Bryum shawl by Cailliau Berangere. I’m really digging the slipped stitch colorwork sections and I’m betting this sideways-knit shawl would work great in any weight of yarn.

See? Graphic, striped shawls are everywhere! Have you come across any others? What’s been inspiring you, lately? Share with us in the comments!

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